Finance

'Worst nightmare': Laid-off workers endure loss…

Around the country, across industries and occupations, millions of jobless Americans are straining to afford the basics now that an extra $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits has expired

The Best Fruit For Health

A list of several fruits that have the best health benefits.

US average mortgage rates fall; 30-year loan at 2…

U.S. average rates on long-term mortgages fell this week, pushing the key 30-year loan to a record low for the eighth time this year

End of The Convention As We Know It?

Especially in the days of television, some of the biggest events in the political calendar have been the prime time Democratic and Republican political conventions. But, this year, the structure of the extravaganzas have changed significantly due to Coronavirus concerns. Experts say, this may not be all bad, in fact, of all events facing a shake up because of the pandemic, political conventions may be best suited for change. 0.22 Alex Vogel: CEO Vogel Group "In modern politics, conventions really had become well produced tv shows. bump to "You will not longer have those amazing shots of delegates swarming around the floor, I think they will be able to produce some of that digitally' Experts argue, in the modern climate, conventions were already less relevant than they had been in the past. Robert Shapiro, Columbia University, 0.40 "The conventions tend to be more publicity shows than substantive events." That's the impact it may have on the viewing public, but what of the parties? Lawrence Tabas, Chair PA GOP 0.50 "It would be nice to have a great convention like we had in Cleveland and the excitement from it, but we will be able to recreate that on many different levels. Jaime Harrison, US Senate Candidate South Carolina 0.57 " A lot of folks look forward to conventions every four years and I'm one of them, But you know, this year we just have to do it differently." And as for the rising stars of the party who normally come to prominence during a convention, it's likely they will still have their moment in the sun. Alex Vogel, CEO Vogel Group 1.17 "Both parties have used conventions, both to highlight their bench, and also to use that as an opportunity to have new voices get the message across and I think that would be no difference in this context at all. And some experts even venture to say, that the lack of delegates may make it easier to toe the party line. Vogel 1.34 In many ways, putting on a convention is a lot easier when you don't have thousands of delegates and the unpredictable nature of human behavior to deal with." While the big crowds, falling balloons, and patriotic music are going by the wayside, it's certain that both parties are working hard to put on a great show.

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New York attorney general seeks to dissolve NRA

New York’s attorney general is suing the National Rifle Association, seeking to put the powerful gun advocacy organization out of business over allegations that high-ranking executives diverted millions of dollars for personal benefit

Muscle Memory and Working Out

Your brain and muscles communicate to allow you to take breaks when you workout.

Diseased deer found in Tehama County

Turkish currency hits all-time low amid market…

Turkey’s currency dropped to an all-time low against the dollar on Thursday

Mindful Technology

More of us are working from home more than every. Here are some tips to make sure you are being healthy with all your screen time.

Joe Biden launches new national ad aimed at Black…

Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential campaign has launched a new national ad focused on Black Americans, urging them to stand up to President Donald Trump the way their ancestors stood up to “violent racists of a generation ago.”

Walmart is Making Some Big Changes

Walmart is receiving praise for its many big changes.

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Hearing set for 4 indicted in $60M Ohio bribery…

A court hearing is set for four people following their indictment on a racketeering charge

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics_Broadcast

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. Script:IN THE RACE FOR A CORONA VIRUS VACCINE, 2 US DRUG MAKERS ARE IN THE THIRD PHASE OF TESTING ... MEANING AN APPROVED VACCINE COULD BE A FEW SHORT MONTHS AWAY. Sot Dr. William Schaffner/ Professor of Preventive Medicine Vanderbilt University School of Medicine3:14 If everything goes as planned perhaps by the beginning of the next year by the beginning of 2021 we will have some information about how safe the vaccine is 3:24 HOWEVER, ACCORDING TO A RECENT POLITICO POLL NEARLY 60 PERCENT OF VOTERS SAY THE *TESTING* OF A VACCINE SHOULD BE THE PRIORITY... INCLUDING IF IT MEANS DELAYING THE ROLLOUT. AND EVEN IF A VACCINE IS AVAILABLE BY EARLY 2021, THE AMERICAN PUBLIC IS STILL SPLIT ON WHETHER OR NOT THEY WILL GET THE VACCINE...IN AN ASSOCIATED PRESS POLL ONLY 50 PERCENT SAID THEY WOULD. Sot Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Stanford6:46 I think the messaging to the American public has to be clear and consistent about the data what we know about the vaccine, how it has been tested, how that data has been evaluated, and we have to be transparent if we are going to build trust and get the adoption that we hope to have 7:06 AND IN A PEW POLL EARLIER THIS SPRING, NEARLY A THIRD OF YOUNG PEOPLE SAY THEY WOULDN'T GET A VACCINE... WHICH IS ESPECIALLY TROUBLING AS MILLENIALS ACCOUNT FOR INCREASING NUMBERS OF COVID CASES... Sot Katherine Baicker Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. 7:15 Once a vaccine is approved I hope that everyone takes it because we are all better off when the disease has nowhere to spread and individuals are better off when they are not susceptible to the disease 7:24ONE FEAR OF HEALTH OFFICIALS IS THAT THE ANTI VAXING COMMUNITY WILL USE THE GENERAL MISTRUST OF GOVERNMENT AND ITS HANDLING OF THE CORONAVIRUS AS A WAY TO SPREAD MISINFORMATION ... MEANING ANOTHER UPHILL BATTLE IN CONTAINING THE VIRUS.

1.2 million seek jobless aid after $600 federal…

Nearly 1.2 million laid-off Americans applied for state unemployment benefits last week, evidence that the coronavirus keeps forcing companies to slash jobs just as a critical $600 weekly federal jobless payment has expired

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University.

Tehama County COVID-19 update reveals much

Nintendo profit zooms as virus has homebodies…

Nintendo Co. saw its April-June profit multiply more than sixfold as people stuck at home over the pandemic turned to playing video games

The Benefits of Dark Chocolate

With the health benefits associated with chocolate, sometimes a snack can go a long way.

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New lockdown ratchets up economic pain in…

A bright side for plant nurseries of Melbourne’s first pandemic stay-at-home order was that many householders took the time to garden

Running Out of Aluminum

Many chose to stock up on beer before the pandemic, causing a shortage in aluminum.

County to distribute free face masks